Screen prints - Lithographs - Original Painting - Vinyl Collectables

TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set
TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set

TŌSHŪSAI SHARAKU x Be@rbrick 'Actor Ōtani Oniji III' Art Figure Set

Regular price
$450.00
Sale price
$450.00
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'Actor Ōtani Oniji III as the Footman (Yakko) Edohei' by Tōshūsai Sharaku (after), 2022
Limited Edition figure collab. with Be@rbrick x Medicom Toy.
Officially licensed by Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Based on the artist's famous original from 1794-1795.
400% figure (11 Inches tall) +
100% figure (2.8 Inches tall)
11.8 x 7.9 x 4.7 Inches (box)
Collectible hydro-dipped vinyl art figure set.
Limited Edition (Sold Out).
Plate-signed in Japanese on reverse.
New in original, unopened box.
Includes Medicom Toy tamper-proof hologram decal.

ARTIST BIO

Tōshūsai Sharaku (Japanese: 東洲斎 写楽; active 1794–1795) was a Japanese ukiyo-e print designer, known for his portraits of kabuki actors. Neither his true name nor the dates of his birth or death are known. His active career as a woodblock artist spanned ten months; his prolific work met disapproval and his output came to an end as suddenly and mysteriously as it had begun. His work has come to be considered some of the greatest in the ukiyo-e genre.

Sharaku made mostly yakusha-e portraits of kabuki actors. His compositions emphasize poses of dynamism and energy, and display a realism unusual for prints of the time—contemporaries such as Utamaro represented their subjects with an idealized beauty, while Sharaku did not shy from showing unflattering details. This was not to the tastes of the public, and the enigmatic artist's production ceased in the first month of 1795.

His mastery of the medium with no apparent apprenticeship has drawn much speculation, and researchers have long tried to discover his true identity—amongst the dozens of proposals, some suggest he was an obscure poet, others a Noh actor, or even the ukiyo-e master Hokusai.