SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set

SHEPARD FAIREY 'Earth Crisis' USED Spray Can Set

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'Earth Crisis' by Shepard Fairey, 2019
Set of 2 artist-used spray cans during the completion of the 'Earth Crisis' mural on 8 Aug. 2019 in Vancouver, CA
7.5 x 2.5 Inches (each can)
5.5 x 7.5 x 3 Inches (display box)
Open Edition (Sold Out).
Comes in clear display box with images and details about the items.
Also includes original COA and matching tamper-proof hologram decals.

ABOUT THE ART

"Anyone that wants to deny climate change has to admit that they also don't believe in science and that they are looking to justify their complacency on the issue," artist-activist Shepard Fairey says.

A towering mural created to ignite thought and conversation about the global climate crisis has brought new beauty to the face of a downtown Vancouver tower.

The Burrard Arts Foundation on Thursday unveiled “Earth Justice” as the inaugural piece for its rotating Surface SeriesThe 10,000 square-foot blue, turquoise and white piece features a globe ringed by a flower and supported by two hands, surrounded by stripes, foliage and broken chains. It covers 20 stories of the west-facing wall of The Burrard Building at 1030 West Georgia.

The artist, 49-year-old Shepard Fairey, is a social activist from the United States whose Barack Obama “Hope” poster went viral during the 2008 presidential election. He is also widely known for his OBEY GIANT art campaign, now in its 30th year, which is represented near the bottom of the mural.

Fairey said the mural — part of his Earth Crisis series — is a call for people to respect and nurture the planet, and understand that how we treat it will have impacts for future generations.

“It’s the epitome of what I am passionate about and it’s an incredible opportunity to engage with the public on a large scale that literally transforms the landscape and, I think, can spark an important conversation,” he said.

Fairey is encouraged by work in Vancouver to protect the environment.But he also hopes the mural will cause cynics and critics to at least question why they are reacting that way.

“I think that art does have the potential to change people’s minds,” he said.

“You can find an angle to dismiss practically everything — life is meaningless, when you get down to it, except for the meaning that you create. I think that when a piece of art appeals and impacts a person emotionally … that leads also to, even if it’s subconscious, an intellectual process.”

- Vancouver Sun (8/1/19)