SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)
SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)

SHEPARD FAIREY 'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' Screen Print (490)

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$850.00
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$850.00
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'Bob Marley: Slave Driver' by Shepard Fairey, 2015
Based on an original image by legendary rock music photographer Dennis Morris.
Originally only offered during Known Gallery show “Revolutionary Dreams" on Feb. 6, 2015.
18 x 24 Inches
Screen print on cream, Speckletone fine art paper.
Limited Edition of 500 (#490/500)
Signed, numbered and dated by the artist.
Also signed by photographer Dennis Morris.

ABOUT THE ART

"This Friday, Feb 6. (2015) check out the Dennis Morris - Bob Marley show “Revolutionary Dreams,” celebrating what would be Bob’s 70th birthday, opening at Known Gallery. I created a Bob Marley print based on one of Dennis’s photos for this show, that will be for sale there with a limited number to be released on our website on the following Tuesday. The Bob Marley print is an edition of 500. Hope to see you there!"

- Shepard

The Bob Marley print is based on a photo by Dennis Morris.

Quote from Shepard’s 20th Year Supply & Demand:

“I bought Bob Marley’s Rastaman Vibrations shortly after I started skateboarding in 1984, purely because the only good skateboard ramp where I lived was called “The Rasta Ramp.” I had mostly been listening to punk rock, but I was excited to discover reggae, which even more boldly embodied many of the same elements of social protest as punk but in a way that was much more palatable to my parents.

I think my parents bought me Bob Marley and the Wailers records for every Christmas or birthday until I had accumulated their entire catalog; my very conservative grandmother even bought me a Bob Marley shirt from Jamaica. I leaned more towards punk, but some punk bands, most notably Bad Brains, embraced both punk and reggae. Bob Marley’s music always cheered me up during my high-school years of personal struggle. I’m always inspired by how steadfast and positive Bob was.”

- Shepard