JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph
JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph

JASPER JOHNS 'Cup 2 Picasso' Offset Lithograph

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Sale price
$450.00

'Cup 2 Picasso' by Jasper Johns, 1973
10.5 x 15 Inches
26.7 x 38.1 CM
Offset lithograph on fine art paper.
Non-editioned multiple.
Plate-signed and dated bottom right.
*Note: damage from previous framing bottom center. Heavy fold across top. Price reflected.

ABOUT THE ART

This image, as well as a companion print Cups 4 Picasso, is based on Marcel Duchamp’s 1958 collage Self-Portrait in Profile. Johns revisited this idea of mirroring a silhouette to make a second image in several works that he made during the last decade.

ARTIST BIO

Jasper Johns was born in 1930 in Augusta, Georgia, and raised in South Carolina. He began drawing as a young child, and from the age of five knew he wanted to be an artist. For three semesters he attended the University of South Carolina at Columbia, where his art teachers urged him to move to New York, which he did in late 1948. There he saw numerous exhibitions and attended the Parsons School of Design for a semester. After serving two years in the army during the Korean War, stationed in South Carolina and Sendai, Japan, he returned to New York in 1953. He soon became friends with the artist Robert Rauschenberg (born 1925), also a Southerner, and with the composer John Cage and the choreographer Merce Cunningham.

Together with Rauschenberg and several Abstract Expressionist painters of the previous generation, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Barnett Newman, Johns is one of the most significant and influential American painters of the twentieth century. He also ranks with Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, Munch, and Picasso as one of the greatest printmakers of any era. In addition, he makes many drawings—unique works on paper, usually based on a painting he has previously painted—and he has created an unusual body of sculptural objects.

As Johns became well known—and perhaps as he realized his audience could be relied upon to study his new work—his subjects with a demonstrable prior existence expanded. In addition to popular icons, Johns chose images that he identified in interviews as things he had seen—for example, a pattern of flagstones he glimpsed on a wall while driving. Still later, the “things the mind already knows” became details from famous works of art, such as the Isenheim Altarpiece by Matthias Grünewald (1475/80–1528), which Johns began to trace onto his work in 1981. Throughout his career, Johns has included in most of his art certain marks and shapes that clearly display their derivation from factual, unimagined things in the world, including handprints and footprints, casts of parts of the body, or stamps made from objects found in his studio, such as the rim of a tin can.