ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print
ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print
ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print
ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print
ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print
ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print
ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print

ERNESTO YERENA 'We Belong to the Land' Screen Print

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$300.00
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$300.00
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'We Belong to the Land' by Ernesto Yerena, 2011
Limited Edition screen print collab. with photographer Aaron Huey.
Released to showcase "Honor the Treaties"; a short film about Native American rights on the Pine Ridge Reservation.
18 x 24 Inches
45.7 x 61 Centimeters
Screen print on cream, Speckletone fine art paper.
Limited Edition of 300 (#95/300)
Signed, numbered and dated by Yerena.
Also signed by photographer Aaron Huey.

ABOUT THE ART

Honor the Treaties is a short film that examines photographer Aaron Hueyʼs powerful advocacy work for Native American rights on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The film explores the idea that journalists often ʻget the story wrong.ʼ

Using Aaronʼs seven-year experience as a photographer on the Pine Ridge Reservation, we examine the idea of growth and change in relationship to telling a story. Aaronʼs advocacy work began with his 2010 TED Talk calling for the return of the Black Hills to the Lakota Sioux. Viewed online over 800,000 times, the talk caught the attention of legendary street artist Shepard Fairey, who, along with artist Ernesto Yerena, teamed up on a nationwide poster campaign based on Aaronʼs images. In November 2011, Shepard and Aaron installed a sixty by eighty foot mural, based on a collage of Aaronʼs images, in Los Angeles.

Aaronʼs movement into advocacy is shown in our film through his collaboration with Fairey. Juxtaposing the urban environment of Los Angeles against the stark, rural poverty of Pine Ridge, the film seeks to draw connections between art & advocacy, ultimately making a case for empowering individuals to ʻtell their own stories'.